Maybelline Queen











Eye shadows offer endless creativity. They just may be the most exciting product for both makeup artists and makeup lovers to buy. These days, the number of colors, textures, and formulations is near infinite. But with all the choices, compiling a makeup kit or adding to your everyday shadow regime can get a little mind-numbing. Here are a few things to think about as you build your perfect eye kit.

 

Even in the basic powder shadow category, brands can be very different due to the amount of pigment versus filler they use, as well as the process in which they press product into pans. Experiment and find the formulas that work best for you and deliver the results you desire. For instance, you might prefer a highly pigmented powder with a small amount of filler that feels dry to the touch, or favor a shadow that feels soft and creamy on your brush and has a lighter pigment load and color payoff. It’s all about discovering your preferences and finding your favorites.

 

Putting a Palette Together

 

I’ve found that palettes are the perfect way to carry makeup for professional work, and they also fit well into a tote or makeup bag. You can purchase pre-made palettes—available in pretty much every price point—from many brands, or buy brand-specific empty palettes and build your own customized collection within one color range. You can also buy empty palettes or containers that allow you to add in pans of eye shadow from multiple brands.

 

A word of advice: keep it simple. When compiling your palette, don’t get caught up in the excitement of buying the most daring shades. So many artists want to get all of the brightest and boldest colors and textures, but basic shadows will be the basis of your application and lay the groundwork for great makeup.

 

Check for Quality

 

I recommend checking the quality of the product before you purchase. Look at reviews online and speak to other artists about what they love or perhaps dislike about the product. I’m not a product snob, but the difference in quality between pro and prestige versus mass products can be obvious and measurable. A few key questions to ask yourself:

 

• Does the shadow allow you versatility in application? Meaning, can you apply it both sheer and with more full coverage?
• When using a variety of brushes, will it have a smooth consistency?
• Is it durable for high-intensity jobs and situations? In other words, does the product cause a lot of fallout on the face during application?

 

1. The Highlighting Palette

 

A highlighting palette made up of lighter shades and base shadows is an absolute must-have. This group includes white, light beige, cream, vanilla, peach, and buttercream shades, as well as soft pinks and apricots. The lighter colors can be used to draw attention to a feature, cause a certain area to pop, or simply make a part of the face look more dominant.

 

 

I prefer to keep these shades in matte or satin consistencies, because you don’t always want your highlight shades to have texture. Base shades should always be matte, or else the shimmer or frost will show through.

 

2. The Contouring Palette

 

Next, to build in shape and definition, think about a contouring palette which include darker colors that will recess an area or make it appear smaller. You can also use contouring shades to line and define brows, eye lids, or any area that needs depth or dimension. This group of shades should contain matte shadows in various cool and warm browns, deep burgundies, rich greys, and neutrals on the darker side of the spectrum—including black.

 

 

3. The Color Palettes

 

Once you have your fundamentals for shape and form, let your creative side come into play by building your color palettes. Here, let your imagination run wild. But still, be strategic and think about what you can combine for unlimited possibility. 

 

 

 

I prefer to separate palettes into warm and cool, and then arrange into common color families. I also like to keep matte and satin textured shadows separate from frosts, shimmers, and glitters so loose particles don’t end up compromising your flat shadows. Think about what works on your clients and what you need to complete the job at hand. Represent all of your primary and secondary colors, tints, shades, and tones. Then, go crazy with an endless array of your faves: deep rich reds, bright yellows, cool blues, greens, pinks, violets, indigos—whatever your heart desires in both soft and strong colors!

 

4. The Texture Palette

 

You will also need a texture palette—something made up of various frosts that highlight, change the surface, or add impact. Metallic eye shadows also fit well into this group and allow you to transform any eye into numerous looks. Stay aware of seasonal trends and what’s on the red carpet and runway for the latest must-have shadow shades.

 

 

Now you know how to meet the needs of any client. Eye shadows can lay the groundwork for a look’s shape, texture, or tone, from traditional to bold. Be smart about your palettes and arm yourself with the right shadows, so you can truly transform any application with a simple swipe.

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{November 25, 2013}   DIY Lash Conditioner

Most of us crave full and natural lashes. Though we can’t change the lashes we have from the inside, we can use topical treatments to help them grow healthier and longer. There are a number of different eyelash serums and growth conditioners you can purchase from the store or have prescribed from your dermatologist. They have their benefits and risks so be sure to do your research or talk with your dermatologist to see which product would suit you best. There are a number of different natural remedies to create your own homemade eyelash conditioners. Results will not come overnight but over a period of weeks–possibly months–so be prepared for a slow process. Take a break from mascara and curling your lashes once in a while to give them a break from all the lash stress. Give these natural eyelash conditioners recipes a try to achieve longer, thicker, and fuller lashes!

DIY SKINCARE Castor Oil Eyelash Conditioner

  1. Castor or almond oil

  2. Vanilla extract

  3. Disposable mascara wands

  4. Small container

Pick up a small bottle of castor or almond oil from the grocery store and disposable mascara wands from the beauty supply store. If you have an old mascara that you aren’t using anymore, disinfect and clean the wand thoroughly to use instead. Just be sure to clean the wand after each use. Pour the castor or almond oil and vanilla extract into your small container (three parts oil to one part vanilla) and shake up the mixture. Dip your mascara wand into conditioner and apply it from root to tip to your top and bottom lashes, twice a day.Be sure to use conditioner on clean lashes.

DIY SKINCARE VItamin E Eyelash Conditioner

  1. Vitamin E oil or capsules

  2. Small container or plate

  3. Cotton Swabs

You can use vitamin E capsules or vials of oil to use as an eyelash conditioner. Squeeze or add a few drops of vitamin E oil into your clean container or plate, making sure not to touch the oil with your fingertips. Dab the cotton swab in the oil and sweep the swab across clean eyelashes from root to tip on both sides of lashes, twice a day (typically in the morning before makeup application and before you go to bed).

DIY SKINCARE Coconut Oil Eyelash Conditioner

  1. Coconut Oil

  2. Extra Virgin Olive Oil

  3. Vitamin E oil or capsules

  4. Small container

  5. Disposable mascara wand or cotton swabs

Pour equal parts of the three oils into a clean container. Dip your mascara wand or cotton swab into conditioner and apply it on the base of your lashes, twice a day. Be sure to use conditioner on clean eyelashes.



Beauties, have you ever wondered how to really give your lashes some oomph? Here’s a pro makeup artist technique to maximize your lash mileage!

HOW TO Make the Most out of Your Mascara Wand

 

Wrap the mascara wand with a protective covering (we like using a small towel or plastic ziplock back so our fingers don’t get dirty).

Grab the wand head and slowly bend it so it’s at a 90 degree angle, perpendicular to the actual brush handle.

Apply mascara in harder to reach areas (like the inner and lower lashes) by holding the wand with your index finger and thumb. This enables you to push the mascara brush deeper into the base of the eyelid, ensuring thicker looking lashes.

After you push the mascara into the base, wiggle the brush repeatedly and lift up. If you don’t feel comfortable bending your full-size mascara, this technique works just as well with disposable mascara wands (and you can use them to brush out mascara clumps after application).

MaybellineQueen Tip #2: Use the end of a disposable mascara wand to apply glue to false eye lashes. Place a bead of glue on the end of the handle and run the strip through the glue for even application.



{November 25, 2013}   Gorg Makeup in Wet Weather!

 

Has your otherwise perfect makeup application been washed away by a surprise downpour? With the rainy season approaching, it’s time to prep your beauty routine to make sure your face never gets drenched on again! Here are some tips and tricks on how to keep your makeup looking gorgeous—not washed out—in wet weather.

Face

The trick to perfecting your base is in the application—instead of caking on a thick amount, make sure to add thin layers of product until you reach coverage you’re happy with. Since powder turns splotchy in the rain, choose a cream, mousse, or liquid texture as a base, to ensure longer-lasting coverage. If you must powder, dust a light layer of translucent powder with a large, fluffy powder brush. Use concealer sparingly, and only where necessary.

Cheeks

Since powder is best to avoid in wet weather, the same holds true for powder blushes. Opt for cream, gel, and mousse textures instead. In a damp atmosphere, these formulations will last longer on the skin.

Eyes

It’s a wet-weather no-brainer: choose waterproof eye liner, mascara, and cream shadow formulas. Avoid using liner or mascara on the waterline and lower lashes—who wants raccoon eyes?

Lips

A rainy day isn’t the best time to experiment with bold shades and extreme textures. Bright colors and high-gloss formulas are typically a rainy day no-no (they have the tendency to smudge everywhere in humidity or dampness). Stick with a neutral, pinky-mauve tone in a comfortable satin formula.




{November 20, 2013}   Holiday Look!

 

It’s party season! Time to pump up the volume with an extra-glitzy face so you’re sure to make that time under the mistletoe tempting. I found three of the hottest holiday trends for you. Try each individually—or if you’re daring rock all three!

Red Lips

It’s a classic for a reason. Red lips evoke the warmth and glamour of Christmas Past. Best of all, anyone can pull it off.

To combat color bleeding or smudging, line your mouth with a matching liner or set the stage with a lip primer that will help keep any bright pigment in place. For true lipstick migration-proofing, nothing beats a reverse lip liner, which uses a clear waxy formula to form a barrier. Finally, for precise lipstick application, use a lip brush.

Gilded Shadow

Metallic shadows are always a holiday staple.

For a high-fashion foil effect, moisten your shadow brush before applying, or smooth on a cream shadow and a tap powder shadow on top with fingers (bonus: this has massive staying power — even after your third eggnog).

Classic Cat Eye

Polished black liquid liner look shows no sign of declining in popularity, with every major brand hustling to debut their pen versions. My new favorites have a patent leather-like sheen that makes them a perfect complement to the glitter and shine of all the season’s parties. The famous cat eye flick takes a bit of practice, but the end result is totally worth it.



{November 20, 2013}   Make Your Own Lip Balm

 

Do you have a bunch of near-empty lipsticks that you don’t know what to do with? Don’t throw them out! You can turn those favorite shades into tinted lip balms. Customize your color, flavor and scent, and even recycle old tins and tubs to give the balm a personal special touch. Just follow these four simple steps.

HOW TO: Make Your Own Lip Balm

  1. Choose a container or tin for your lip balm. You can use an empty Altoids tin (like the one above) or anything that will hold the balm. Just be sure to wash it in hot soapy water and let it dry completely.

  2. Prepare your ingredients. The general rule is two parts oil to one part beeswax. You can use any oil that you like. Try adding almond oil for added moisture or peppermint oil for a fresh scent.

  3. Melt the beeswax in a double boiler, ensuring that the top bowl does not touch the water. Once the wax melted, remove from the heat. Add your oils and as much lipstick as you want (the more lipstick you use, the darker the color will be).

  4. Immediately pour the hot mixture into the desired tin. Let it cool overnight before using it on your lips.

Image courtesy of pinterest


 

 

When it comes to buying the right concealer, a lot of people get nervous. Some don’t know how to find their shade or even where exactly to apply it on the face. Others think they have it figured out, and then end up looking like a reversed raccoon, with white rings around the eyes.

 

But that doesn’t have to happen. Once you know the professional tricks for choosing a shade that’s right and putting it on correctly, concealer is your best friend. It can brighten a tired face, cover a blemish, bring attention to a focal point, and camouflage under-eye discoloration (without the reversed raccoon effect). Used with foundation, concealer can also change or refine any complexion with dramatic, painterly effect.

 

Old-school concealers are still a part of every person’s makeup arsenal. They tend to be cream or opaque-liquid formulas and come in a variety of forms—pots, wands, and sticks. Traditionally, concealers are dense by design and can feel a bit like your grandmother’s makeup, or the kind of product favored by rich octagenarians in Palm Springs.

 

As such, I am not always a fan of traditional concealers. When not applied correctly, they can look cakey and heavy. They also tend to be yellow in tone, which gives you limited color-correction capabilities. That said, a traditional concealer can be useful for its density and opaque pigment. When you need true camouflage or heavy coverage, it generally does the trick. 

 

Yet in place of traditional concealers, I tend to prefer the newer, more lightweight-formula products on the market these days. The sheerness of these newer concealers allows me to combine them with other formulas and foundation, so that the skin looks flawless both in photos and in person. And today’s concealers aren’t limited to yellow—they come in a wider range of undertones like peach, coral, or orange. The trick with color correction is to choose a concealer with a base which has an undertone opposite of the discoloration you’re trying to cover up. For example, to disguise blue-toned under-eye circles, try a concealer with a peach or coral undertone.

 

Carrying my concealers in palettes means I always have the perfect shade with me. In my go-to, I usually keep a peach tone, along with an apricot, deep orange, bright orange, plus a yellow and a pink or red—and all in a light, medium, and dark shade. Of course, not all skin tones work with yellows and pinks, so I also carry a palette of primary colors plus concealers in white, dark brown, and black. This allows me to custom-mix any shade I might need. For darker skin, sometimes a bright orange and a deep orange concealer can save you from having to use a large amount of foundation.

 

Here’s some more time-tested advice. Now go conceal with confidence!

 

To get the perfect highlight, choose a concealer one or two shades lighter than the complexion. To contour with perfect depth and dimension, choose a concealer one or two shades darker than the complexion.

 

For under-eye shadows and bruises, I prefer a soft, creamy formula that stays put. It’s important to find something that does not dry out or settle into creases and separate.

 

For under-eye bags or discoloration and puffiness, I prefer a product that also has color-correction properties. I love creams in peach or coral for light blue under-eye discoloration and orange for darker and deeper skin tones. (Mineral powder concealers are great, too, because they stay set and work well over highlighted areas.) The trick with under-eye concealer? Choose one that is one or two shades lighter if you need a bit of lift. Match the complexion completely if you want a smooth, even skin tone all over. And for protruding skin or puffiness under the eye, go with something one or two shades darker.

 

 

For spot concealer over blemishes or broken capillaries, I love a concealer that can be applied in sheer strokes and built up in layers for more coverage. A formula with a satin finish will also look more like real skin, rather than accentuate texture like a matte product might.

 

 

 

For scars and cuts, it is important to remember that concealer and makeup do not hide texture. But you can trick the eye by using darker shades to recess or deepen a protrusion or a lighter color to pull something forward. Simple tricks can draw attention away from what you want to keep secret, and spotlight another area of the face.

 

Lighter concealer shades are ideal for making lips look larger and opening up small areas. Try a concealer one shade lighter around the lip line to make lips look kissable and pouty, while achieving the perfect size and shape.

 



 

First there were BB creams, then CCs, and now—you guessed it, DDs. With so many different versions of skin-perfecting products at a range of price points on the market these days, it’s hard to know which to try.

 

Believe it or not, BB creams aka “beauty balms” or “blemish balms,” have actually been around since the ‘60s! The first version was formulated by a German dermatologist, Dr. Christine Schrammek, as a way to help heal patients’ skin and hide redness after a peel or treatment. BBs were introduced to the masses in South Korea and Japan in 1985 and, and hit the U.S. market in 2011, quickly becoming a standout seller for many brands despite a crowded makeup market. Following that success, CC creams (“color correction” or “color control”) were the inevitable next step. BBs were designed to instantly even out skin tone and make your complexion work better, and, in most cases, have SPF built in; CCs take it to the next level, providing all of that, plus long-term benefits—most are made to color correct and improve skin tone over time with regular use.

 

As if things couldn’t get anymore confusing, this year, Julep was the first brand to launch a DD—or “dynamic do-all”—cream in the U.S, which combines the benefits of both BB and CCs together. Initially, BBs and CCs came only in limited shades, often lighter on the complexion spectrum, but now, thankfully, brands like AJ Crimson, Cover FX, and Clinique have released a full range to accommodate skin tones from very light to very dark.

 

It’s a lot to take in, and even after extensive research we’re not convinced there’s a real, marked difference between all three. Still, every product offers different benefits—and we figure any multitasker that can streamline our beauty routines is worth a go.

 

BBs (“beauty balm” or “blemish balm”)

 

BBs are like tinted moisturizers, which give light coverage and hydration perfect for everyday use, but with added benefits. They’re a skincare–makeup hybrid that does it all: primes, refreshes, brightens, moisturizes, and protects (most versions include SPF from 15 up to 50 and beyond). If you want more coverage, you can also try using a BB as a primer under your foundation, rather than switching to a heavier foundation. 

 

CCs (“color correction” or “color control”)

 

CC creams tend to give a little more coverage than BBs, but still feel light and offer similar benefits. The difference is the addition of color correcting ingredients (for example, vitamin C), which help diminish dark spots, neutralize redness, and improve the appearance of skin that’s dull, ashy, or uneven over time. If you have problem skin (anything from acne to hyperpigmentation) or want anti-aging benefits, CC creams may be the right choice.

 

DDs (“dynamic do-all” or “dynamic do-it-all”)

 

Designed to diffuse light, a DD’s strongest asset is its arsenal of anti-agers—usually some combination of botanical oils, hyaluronic acid, antioxidants, and peptides. They’re best for aging skin, and those who want to focus on improving tone and diminishing wrinkles over time. The best DDs are ideal for covering up wrinkles, blemishes, and dark spots, and also work to actually battle all three while you wear them.



{November 13, 2013}   Dress Up Your Lips

 

Who said eyes get to have all the fun? Keep reading for three awesomely impractical but ultra-fun ways to dress up your lips this season. 

Glitter and rhinestones aren’t the most practical lip art for everyday, but we sure love the sparkle and shine of some lip bling. For easy application and removal, apply rhinestones or any embellishments with false eye lash glue. To apply glitter, prime lips with a tacky primer or gloss and pat glitter on with your finger for a dazzling finish.

Nothing says glam more than lustrous metal. Unfortunately, the gold-plated look doesn’t translate well to real life (I don’t recommend this for your next family gathering). For a hint of gilded sparkle, slick on a sheer gold gloss in the center of lips.

 Ombré effects take center stage on hair, nails, and now your pucker. This cool technique gives lips a new multi-dimensional effect, and the possibilities are boundless! Experiment with different color variations, play with placement, and be sure to blend seamlessly.



{November 13, 2013}   Statement Eyes

Move over, eye shadow! From crystals to velvet stamps, check out three awesomely unique ways to create stunning statement eyes.

Gems, pearls, and even Swarovski crystals! Adding a little bling to your lids has more dazzle than shimmering eye shadow or bold metallic liner ever could. Try rimming your lash lines with crystals or just place one crystal in the inner corner.

Sometimes layering a bit of texture on your eyes can create a multidimensional effect. Eye Liner Patches have a soft velvet texture, not to mention they come in a variety of interesting shapes.

A quick visit to your local arts and crafts store can result in a slew of fun and creative appliqués. If you have patience—and a steady hand with an X-Acto knife—you can design your own seasonal shapes (e.g., mini snowflakes, leaves, or flowers). 



et cetera