Maybelline Queen











{December 12, 2013}   “Building Your Kit” Recap

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Developed for film and popularized by the ’60s Mod movement, faux lashes hit it big when supermodel Twiggy made them part of her trademark look. These days faux lashes are still super popular, but often abused or misused. Many makeup artists and consumers don’t seem to comprehend that the primary goal of a faux lash is to make people think it’s real, rather an exotic caterpillar taking up residence on your face.

With lashes, I prefer subtlety—something that allows me to make the eye look its best without looking obviously faux. Of course, there are times when you may want a more extreme look. But whether you want to accomplish an exaggerated, dramatic eye or just add on lashes for more volume, faux lashes take practice to master.

Four Basic Types of Lashes

Falsies come in three materials: human hair, animal hair, and synthetic fiber. (The latter was overlooked in the past, but the latest crop of synthetic lashes are completely believable.) There are four basic types of lashes available.

Strip

A standard, one-piece faux lash attached to a band that comes in a variety of lengths and styles.

Individual

Single faux lashes, attached separately; each mimics one individual hair.

“Clump” or “Cluster”

A small clump of individual lashes bound together, usually in a V shape, to give more volume.

Extensions

Individual tips that are applied to give the illusion of a real lash, but just longer.

Individual and clump lashes also come in both “knotted” and “knot-free” versions. Knotted lashes are bound by a knot, which creates more surface area for glue and makes them easier to attach; knot-free lashes don’t have a knot joining them. As such, they are more difficult to apply, but also look more natural. Within all of these types, you’ll find everything from undetectable, natural-looking bands to basic individual lashes to fantasy looks adorned with feathers or crystals. Lashes in other-worldly colors and exaggerated lengths or shapes are easy to find these days, too.

Three Faux Lash Ground Rules

Whether you want to apply a few individuals for subtle volume, add clumps on the outer lashes, or do  a complete set of full lashes for sexiness or drama, here are some ground rules for getting the most out of this gorgeous—but tricky—beauty regime.

1: Find Your Size

Fit and finish are important to the overall eye makeup design, as you don’t want the lashes to overwhelm the face. So, first things first: make sure you select the appropriate style, size, length, and intensity for the eye shape that you’re working with, as well as the overall look you’re going for.

2: How Faux Can You Go?

One rule of thumb is to look at length and thickness. The longer the length or the closer the lashes are packed, the more likely it’ll be obvious that your faux lashes are false.

3: Customize Your Eyes

Lashes can be cut into the right shape for any eye. I prefer to customize faux lashes by choosing several different shapes that fit my client. Then, I combine them in the application.

Application Tips, by Lash Shape

Here is a basic breakdown of the many shapes available so you can determine when, where, and why to choose a particular faux lash. This can also help you identify what you need to carry in your makeup kit.

Natural, Sparse, or Evenly Spaced

The lashes that might fall under these categories are an ideal option for adding fullness or featuring a natural look with a little more finish. A great trick to keep the look natural is to cut off the outer part of the lash and use the middle piece at the outer corner of the eye. The end of a faux lash can sometimes look much more exaggerated than the middle piece.

Spike

Spike lashes—those that are thicker at the base or sharp or pointy on the end and clumped together—can help you get a retro or vintage eye look. Spikes work equally well for period-inspired makeup (especially a ’70s look) as they do when layered with individuals for a modern red carpet look.

Crisscross or X

Some types of eyes, like smaller eyes or shallow-lidded ones, can’t carry several sets of lashes. If you want to add drama and extreme dimension without extra weight, a crisscrossed style lash, in which hairs overlap into an “X” shape, can be your best friend.

Swept, Angle, or “Hollywood”

For Old Hollywood excitement or to complement cat-like eyeliner, these shapes are seamless. They’re an excellent addition to liquid liner and can really give leading-lady eyes to any ingénue.

Dense, Bulky, or Full

When you want drama that does not necessarily look natural, these lashes are for you. Whether you want to portray the aforementioned Twiggy look or a super-lashy look like those favored by Real Housewives and Kardashians, these lashes pack a punch.

Wisps

Wisps are bands comprised of faux lashes of different lengths, grouped together in varying layers and sections. It’s a versatile shape that can be glamorous, elegant, or simply give a lift to a natural, romantic eye.

Clumps or Clusters

Sometimes you want to get detailed with your look. Whether you are wearing knotted or knot-free versions, clump lashes can be worn on their own or layered with a strip. Either way, they can make eyes appear more open and draw attention where you want it along the lid.

Individual

Single lashes are fantastic for a really natural look. I use a stronger glue and apply these below the actual lash to add length and volume. Even your closest friends won’t notice.

I like to carry an assortment that allows me to achieve whatever comes my way—from a Florence and the Machine video to a morning television makeup job. For me, that means carrying a pack in my kit that includes knot-free individuals, spikes, and wisps in brown and black. I feel like if I always have these on hand, I can make them into anything I need. I also add lashes in for specific jobs if I deem it necessary. A music video might require something more fantastical, while a photo shoot might need something retro-inspired. Regardless of your work or looks, here’s something I do know: faux lashes allow us to take ordinary makeup and make it extraordinary. That is most definitely true.



 

Eyebrows are one of the most misunderstood areas of makeup artistry, and having an artist’s understanding of eyebrows is crucial to impeccable makeup.

As a makeup artist, you need to be situational when correcting, filling in or shaping a brow — making decisions based on the needs of your client and the final look you trying to create. Many makeup artists want to add a dramatic eyebrow into every makeup application, but an inappropriate eyebrow can age your client, distort the shape of the face, provide an unwanted emotion or take away from the desired focal point of your makeup design.

 

Tweezers and scissors are your first line of defense against offensive brows. With these tools, you can create shape as well as adjust thickness and length. Every artist should have a great pair of slant tweezers (some artists favorites are Tweezerman and Lavaque) as well as safety scissors, which are essential for trimming and adjusting.

 

For a true artist trick, try a pair of “twissors” (a scissor-tweezer hybrid) from Alcone or Cinema Secrets. Because they can cut hair really close to the skin without cutting the skin itself, twissors make eyebrow sculpting even easier: you can get rid of hairs that are too long or growing in the wrong direction without the time commitment of tweezing, or redness it can cause. I also recommend carrying a brush or comb for setting the brow hairs into place.

 

Many artists leave eyebrow pencils out of their makeup arsenal, but don’t make that mistake—pencils are a must-have. Pencils work perfectly on brows, because the marks sit on top of the skin and add dimension, providing volume to a flat or thin brows. Use them to fill in sparse or patchy eyebrows with a natural look that mimics missing hairs. I prefer mechanical pencils, as the thinner tip allows for precise application and appears more natural. My favorites include Kevyn Aucoin’s The Precision Brow Pencil, MAC Eye Brows, and Anastasia Brow Wiz.

 

Shadows and other powder-based products bring dimension and depth to brows, especially those that might are on the too-full side. They are also ideal for long wear and allow a range of effects from natural to dramatic. I prefer those that are dense in pigment and have a matte finish. I recommend carrying powders from soft taupes to rich browns to complement natural eye and hair hues, as well as burgundy and burnt sienna for matching processed hair colors.

 

Gels and waxes are wonderful for lightening a darker brow or holding a disorderly one in place. Softening or sculpting the brow can take years off of the face and can help spotlight certain elements of the face. For example, if you want the focus to be a smoky eye, lightening up the eyebrow a few shades can direct attention where you want or need it. For a collection that’s as universal as possible, carry brow gels or waxes in clear, blonde, ash, and taupe.

Pro Tips

For a modern brow, you need to see skin and individual hairs. I also aim to have high and low points in every brow look I create. A great pro trick is to use a brow pen or gel liner with a small precision brush to mimic the look of individual hairs. Just a few subtle strokes can make even the thinnest or most over tweezed eyebrows look terrific. I love pens specifically designed for this purpose, but a brown gel liner from any line will do.

 

Great eyebrows are a secret essential element. When applied correctly, an eyebrow frames the eye, flatters the face, and provides balance without competing with the rest of your makeup. Be prepared to deliver the perfect eyebrow with every application, and your makeup will always be beauty page perfection.



{November 25, 2013}   DIY Lash Conditioner

Most of us crave full and natural lashes. Though we can’t change the lashes we have from the inside, we can use topical treatments to help them grow healthier and longer. There are a number of different eyelash serums and growth conditioners you can purchase from the store or have prescribed from your dermatologist. They have their benefits and risks so be sure to do your research or talk with your dermatologist to see which product would suit you best. There are a number of different natural remedies to create your own homemade eyelash conditioners. Results will not come overnight but over a period of weeks–possibly months–so be prepared for a slow process. Take a break from mascara and curling your lashes once in a while to give them a break from all the lash stress. Give these natural eyelash conditioners recipes a try to achieve longer, thicker, and fuller lashes!

DIY SKINCARE Castor Oil Eyelash Conditioner

  1. Castor or almond oil

  2. Vanilla extract

  3. Disposable mascara wands

  4. Small container

Pick up a small bottle of castor or almond oil from the grocery store and disposable mascara wands from the beauty supply store. If you have an old mascara that you aren’t using anymore, disinfect and clean the wand thoroughly to use instead. Just be sure to clean the wand after each use. Pour the castor or almond oil and vanilla extract into your small container (three parts oil to one part vanilla) and shake up the mixture. Dip your mascara wand into conditioner and apply it from root to tip to your top and bottom lashes, twice a day.Be sure to use conditioner on clean lashes.

DIY SKINCARE VItamin E Eyelash Conditioner

  1. Vitamin E oil or capsules

  2. Small container or plate

  3. Cotton Swabs

You can use vitamin E capsules or vials of oil to use as an eyelash conditioner. Squeeze or add a few drops of vitamin E oil into your clean container or plate, making sure not to touch the oil with your fingertips. Dab the cotton swab in the oil and sweep the swab across clean eyelashes from root to tip on both sides of lashes, twice a day (typically in the morning before makeup application and before you go to bed).

DIY SKINCARE Coconut Oil Eyelash Conditioner

  1. Coconut Oil

  2. Extra Virgin Olive Oil

  3. Vitamin E oil or capsules

  4. Small container

  5. Disposable mascara wand or cotton swabs

Pour equal parts of the three oils into a clean container. Dip your mascara wand or cotton swab into conditioner and apply it on the base of your lashes, twice a day. Be sure to use conditioner on clean eyelashes.



{November 25, 2013}   Gorg Makeup in Wet Weather!

 

Has your otherwise perfect makeup application been washed away by a surprise downpour? With the rainy season approaching, it’s time to prep your beauty routine to make sure your face never gets drenched on again! Here are some tips and tricks on how to keep your makeup looking gorgeous—not washed out—in wet weather.

Face

The trick to perfecting your base is in the application—instead of caking on a thick amount, make sure to add thin layers of product until you reach coverage you’re happy with. Since powder turns splotchy in the rain, choose a cream, mousse, or liquid texture as a base, to ensure longer-lasting coverage. If you must powder, dust a light layer of translucent powder with a large, fluffy powder brush. Use concealer sparingly, and only where necessary.

Cheeks

Since powder is best to avoid in wet weather, the same holds true for powder blushes. Opt for cream, gel, and mousse textures instead. In a damp atmosphere, these formulations will last longer on the skin.

Eyes

It’s a wet-weather no-brainer: choose waterproof eye liner, mascara, and cream shadow formulas. Avoid using liner or mascara on the waterline and lower lashes—who wants raccoon eyes?

Lips

A rainy day isn’t the best time to experiment with bold shades and extreme textures. Bright colors and high-gloss formulas are typically a rainy day no-no (they have the tendency to smudge everywhere in humidity or dampness). Stick with a neutral, pinky-mauve tone in a comfortable satin formula.




 

If you’re a makeup artist, you know to clean your lipstick between customers. When you’re shopping for the perfect shade, you wouldn’t dream of swiping it on without sanitizing. But what if you’re the only one who uses your lipsticks? Cold season is looming, you know. Even if you are the only one primping, it may be a good idea to disinfect your tubes from time to time.

AT HOME

Try an alcohol bath for your lipstick case.70% alcohol is concentrated enough to kill bacteria, and won’t evaporate as quickly as higher concentrations. Hold the lipstick in a cup of 70% alcohol for a few seconds to remove the first layer of product. Let the stick dry naturally. This prolongs the contact with alcohol so it can sanitize as it dries.

ON SET

It’s a good practice to use a mixing palette when working on other faces. Simply shave a small portion of the intended product off with a Q-tip or small spatula onto the palette.This ensures each client gets a fresh sample, and it’s easier to mix and keep handy for touch-ups.

AT THE MAKEUP COUNTER

Makeup testers can harbor some nasty stuff, so make sure you always sanitize before trying on a new shade. With a Q-tip, shave off the top layer of the lipstick. Then spray with alcohol (counters will always have a bottle on hand) and wipe with a tissue.



{November 20, 2013}   Holiday Look!

 

It’s party season! Time to pump up the volume with an extra-glitzy face so you’re sure to make that time under the mistletoe tempting. I found three of the hottest holiday trends for you. Try each individually—or if you’re daring rock all three!

Red Lips

It’s a classic for a reason. Red lips evoke the warmth and glamour of Christmas Past. Best of all, anyone can pull it off.

To combat color bleeding or smudging, line your mouth with a matching liner or set the stage with a lip primer that will help keep any bright pigment in place. For true lipstick migration-proofing, nothing beats a reverse lip liner, which uses a clear waxy formula to form a barrier. Finally, for precise lipstick application, use a lip brush.

Gilded Shadow

Metallic shadows are always a holiday staple.

For a high-fashion foil effect, moisten your shadow brush before applying, or smooth on a cream shadow and a tap powder shadow on top with fingers (bonus: this has massive staying power — even after your third eggnog).

Classic Cat Eye

Polished black liquid liner look shows no sign of declining in popularity, with every major brand hustling to debut their pen versions. My new favorites have a patent leather-like sheen that makes them a perfect complement to the glitter and shine of all the season’s parties. The famous cat eye flick takes a bit of practice, but the end result is totally worth it.



{November 20, 2013}   Make Your Own Lip Balm

 

Do you have a bunch of near-empty lipsticks that you don’t know what to do with? Don’t throw them out! You can turn those favorite shades into tinted lip balms. Customize your color, flavor and scent, and even recycle old tins and tubs to give the balm a personal special touch. Just follow these four simple steps.

HOW TO: Make Your Own Lip Balm

  1. Choose a container or tin for your lip balm. You can use an empty Altoids tin (like the one above) or anything that will hold the balm. Just be sure to wash it in hot soapy water and let it dry completely.

  2. Prepare your ingredients. The general rule is two parts oil to one part beeswax. You can use any oil that you like. Try adding almond oil for added moisture or peppermint oil for a fresh scent.

  3. Melt the beeswax in a double boiler, ensuring that the top bowl does not touch the water. Once the wax melted, remove from the heat. Add your oils and as much lipstick as you want (the more lipstick you use, the darker the color will be).

  4. Immediately pour the hot mixture into the desired tin. Let it cool overnight before using it on your lips.

Image courtesy of pinterest


 

 

When it comes to buying the right concealer, a lot of people get nervous. Some don’t know how to find their shade or even where exactly to apply it on the face. Others think they have it figured out, and then end up looking like a reversed raccoon, with white rings around the eyes.

 

But that doesn’t have to happen. Once you know the professional tricks for choosing a shade that’s right and putting it on correctly, concealer is your best friend. It can brighten a tired face, cover a blemish, bring attention to a focal point, and camouflage under-eye discoloration (without the reversed raccoon effect). Used with foundation, concealer can also change or refine any complexion with dramatic, painterly effect.

 

Old-school concealers are still a part of every person’s makeup arsenal. They tend to be cream or opaque-liquid formulas and come in a variety of forms—pots, wands, and sticks. Traditionally, concealers are dense by design and can feel a bit like your grandmother’s makeup, or the kind of product favored by rich octagenarians in Palm Springs.

 

As such, I am not always a fan of traditional concealers. When not applied correctly, they can look cakey and heavy. They also tend to be yellow in tone, which gives you limited color-correction capabilities. That said, a traditional concealer can be useful for its density and opaque pigment. When you need true camouflage or heavy coverage, it generally does the trick. 

 

Yet in place of traditional concealers, I tend to prefer the newer, more lightweight-formula products on the market these days. The sheerness of these newer concealers allows me to combine them with other formulas and foundation, so that the skin looks flawless both in photos and in person. And today’s concealers aren’t limited to yellow—they come in a wider range of undertones like peach, coral, or orange. The trick with color correction is to choose a concealer with a base which has an undertone opposite of the discoloration you’re trying to cover up. For example, to disguise blue-toned under-eye circles, try a concealer with a peach or coral undertone.

 

Carrying my concealers in palettes means I always have the perfect shade with me. In my go-to, I usually keep a peach tone, along with an apricot, deep orange, bright orange, plus a yellow and a pink or red—and all in a light, medium, and dark shade. Of course, not all skin tones work with yellows and pinks, so I also carry a palette of primary colors plus concealers in white, dark brown, and black. This allows me to custom-mix any shade I might need. For darker skin, sometimes a bright orange and a deep orange concealer can save you from having to use a large amount of foundation.

 

Here’s some more time-tested advice. Now go conceal with confidence!

 

To get the perfect highlight, choose a concealer one or two shades lighter than the complexion. To contour with perfect depth and dimension, choose a concealer one or two shades darker than the complexion.

 

For under-eye shadows and bruises, I prefer a soft, creamy formula that stays put. It’s important to find something that does not dry out or settle into creases and separate.

 

For under-eye bags or discoloration and puffiness, I prefer a product that also has color-correction properties. I love creams in peach or coral for light blue under-eye discoloration and orange for darker and deeper skin tones. (Mineral powder concealers are great, too, because they stay set and work well over highlighted areas.) The trick with under-eye concealer? Choose one that is one or two shades lighter if you need a bit of lift. Match the complexion completely if you want a smooth, even skin tone all over. And for protruding skin or puffiness under the eye, go with something one or two shades darker.

 

 

For spot concealer over blemishes or broken capillaries, I love a concealer that can be applied in sheer strokes and built up in layers for more coverage. A formula with a satin finish will also look more like real skin, rather than accentuate texture like a matte product might.

 

 

 

For scars and cuts, it is important to remember that concealer and makeup do not hide texture. But you can trick the eye by using darker shades to recess or deepen a protrusion or a lighter color to pull something forward. Simple tricks can draw attention away from what you want to keep secret, and spotlight another area of the face.

 

Lighter concealer shades are ideal for making lips look larger and opening up small areas. Try a concealer one shade lighter around the lip line to make lips look kissable and pouty, while achieving the perfect size and shape.

 



Suede, silk, satin—we’re talking lipstick, not fashion. With new technology and product formulations, lip color is available in a wide array of textures and finishes. But with so much selection, how do you choose the right coating of color for you? I break down common lip color lingo so you can paint on the pretty pout you want.

MATTE

Lip pigments with a matte texture appear dull and flat on the skin, with no shine at all. Similar formulas termed “suede” or “velvet” have the same lackluster finish, but appear more powdery on lips than smooth. Typically, these formulas are extremely dense in pigment and have wonderful durability, but they may dry lips out without a balm or primer underneath.

 MaybellineQueen Recommends
Maybelline Baby Lips

iStockphoto/ThinkstockSATIN

Silky satin formulas are similar in color payoff to matte lipsticks, but are formulated with an emollient base of oils and butters. Because of the slip-factor, they have medium staying power—a couple of hours without food or drink. Available in solid swivel-tube and as a dense liquid lip color with wand applicator, they’re the most comfortable pigment-heavy formula for daily wear.

MaybellineQueen Recommends
Maybelline Color Sensational and/or Superstay 24 Products

iStockphoto/ThinkstockSHIMMER

Frosty or shimmering lip colors are formulated with special micas designed to impart an iridescent, organza-like finish to the lips. Glimmering pigment adds luster to a flat surface like lip gloss, but relies on solely on actual flecks of shimmer—not sticky gloss—for the sheen. We recommend a translucent layer for the classiest daytime radiance.

MaybellineQueen Recommends
Maybelline Color Sensational and/Superstay 24 Products

iStockphoto/ThinkstockBUTTER

Not quite a gloss nor a satin lipstick, tinted lip butters provide ample, high-shine coverage from a tube. These pigmented, travel-friendly shine alternatives won’t leak in your purse as lip gloss can, and nourishing ingredients hydrate your lips all day. Unfortunately, their moisturizing formula doesn’t bode well for longevity.

MaybellineQueen Recommends
Maybelline Color Whisper by Color Sensational

iStockphoto/ThinkstockSPECIAL EFFECTS

Zany, textured lips aren’t exactly the office beauty standard, but companies are beginning to develop innovative new finishes that break out of the mold and appeal to a more youthful, experimental generation. Appliques, temporary tattoos, and tar-like rainbow finishes—what will they think of next?

MaybellineQueen Recommends
Baby Lips Electro Lip Balm,Color Elixir by Color Sensational, and/or Color Sensational VIvids


et cetera